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VMware Cloud Foundation 

Deploying an NSX Edge Cluster 

 

Welcome to this demonstration on deploying an NSX Edge Cluster in preparation for enabling vSphere with Kubernetes. 

 

vSphere with Kubernetes uses VMware NSX to provide network connectivity for the vSphere Pods in the supervisor cluster and related Kubernetes Service.  This network connectivity comes by the way of an NSX Edge Cluster. 

 

vSphere with Kubernetes also requires creating several logical constructs that run inside the NSX edge cluster to include:

 

    A tier-0 logical gateway to provide routing to and from the upstream network.

    A tier-1 logical gateway to provide routing from the Kubernetes workloads running in the cluster to the tier-0 gateway.

    Segments associated with each namespace to provide connectivity to the control plane VMs and vSphere Pods.

    Load balancers for the Kubernetes API servers and other user deployed applications requiring access to and from external networks. 

 

The simplest way to deploy an NSX Edge Cluster and configure the related NSX objects need by vSphere with Kubernetes is to use VMware Cloud Foundation.  

 

This demonstration shows how to use the advanced automation capabilities of the SDDC Manager to deploy and configure an NSX Edge Cluster and configure the related NSX components.

 

We begin with a brief overview of the demo environment.

  • Click VI Domain

There are two domains: the Management Domain and a single VI Domain named “wld01”.  Note that NSX-T was installed and configured in the VI Domain by the SDDC Manager during the domain creation. 

  • Click wld01
  • Click Hosts

There are three hosts assigned to the domain.

  • Click Clusters

These hosts are part of a single vSphere cluster named “wld01-clus01”.

  • Click the vSphere browser tab

From the vSphere web client we see that the wld01-clus01 cluster is currently empty, meaning there are no VMs or namespaces deployed.

  • Click the NSX browser tab
  • Click Edge Transport Nodes

Switching to the NSX Manager, we see that there are currently no Edge Transport Nodes deployed.

  • Click the SDDC Manager browser tab

We will now create an Edge Cluster for the wld01 domain. 

  • Click Actions
  • Click Add Edge Cluster

We are presented with a list of prerequisites required before deploying the edge cluster.  These include:

 

    Having VLAN IDs and IP addresses for the Edge Transport Nodes.

    When using BGP, having an Autonomous System Numbers (ASN) and ensuring the BGP peers are configured in the upstream network.

    Creating DNS entries for the Edge Transport Nodes

  • Click Select All
  • Click Begin

We start by providing the details for the Edge Cluster

  • Click the Edge Cluster name input field

We assign a name for the edge cluster, specify the desired MTU value, provide the BGP ASN, and assign a name for the tier-0 and tier-1 logical routers.

  • Click the Edge Cluster Profile Type dropdown

Choosing a custom edge cluster profile allows you to set additional parameters.  For this demo we will stick with the default values.

  • Click default

We then set the passwords for the root, admin and audit user accounts.

  • Click Enter Password
  • Click Next
  • Click Workload Management

When deploying an Edge Cluster for use with vSphere with Kubernetes, we choose “Workload Management”.  This presets the form factor (Large) and tier-0 HA mode (active/active) to the values required for vSphere with Kubernetes.  We accept the default value of EBGP for the Tier0 Routing Type.

  • Click Next

The next step is to provide information for the first Edge Transport Node, to include the fully qualified hostname, management IP, TEP IPs, TEP VLAN ID, and choosing the target vSphere Cluster where we want to deploy the edge node. 

  • Click Input value

Note, VCF 4.0 only supports a cluster type of L2 Uniform.  This requires all hosts in the vSphere cluster have identical management, uplink, host TEP, and Edge TEP network configurations.  Support for “L2 Non-Uniform and L3” is not implemented in VCF 4.0.

  • Click the Scroll Bar

Next, we provide the VLAN ID, IP Address, and BGP details for the first uplink interface.

  • Click Uplink VLAN
  • Click Scroll Bar

We then provide the VLAN ID, IP Address, and BGP details for the second uplink interface.

  • Click Next
  • Click Uplink VLAN

We have entered all the required details for the first Edge Node. 

  •  Click Add Edge Node

We repeat these steps to add the second Edge Node.

  • Click Scroll Bar
  • Click Edge Node Name (FQDN)
  • Click Add Edge Node

With both Edge Nodes added, we are ready to review the settings.

  • Click Next

At the summary screen, we scroll down to review the values provided.

  • Click Scroll Bar
  • Click Next

The SDDC Manager performs several checks to validate the input parameters and check for common errors.  These checks include verifying DNS entries, checking for duplicate IPs, making sure IP addresses aren’t already in use, and ensuring the specific object names are unique.  Ensure the validation checks are successful.

  • Click Scroll Bar
  • Click Finish

This SDDC Manager then invokes a workflow that will use the values provided to automate the deployment of the edge nodes, the creation of an edge cluster, and the configuration of the tier-0 and tier-1 routers.

  • Click to expand the task pane
  • Click to maximize the task pane
  • Click Adding edge cluster edge-cluster

Expanding the workflow, we can view the 38 separate tasks that were performed to deploy the edge cluster and configure the logical routers.  The time required to deploy the edge cluster will vary based on the size of your hardware, typically it will take approximately 20 minutes.

  • Click X
  • Click the vSphere – wld01-clus01 – Summary browser tab

Returning to the vSphere web client, we now see a resource pool created in the wld01-clus01 cluster.

  • Click VCF-Edge_edge-cluster-wld…

Inside the resource pool, we see the two Edge Transport Nodes that were deployed by the SDDC Manager.

  • Click the NSX browser tab
  • Click Refresh (bottom of the page) 

Inside the NSX Manager, we can view details for the two Edge Nodes.

  • Click Edge Clusters

We see the two Edge Nodes configured in a single NSX Edge Cluster.

  • Click Networking

Along with deploying the Edge Nodes and creating an Edge Cluster, a logical tier-0 and tier-1 router were also created.

  • Click Tier-0 Gateways
  • Click > to expand the tier-0 gateway
  • Click BGP
  • Click BGP Neighbors 2

Here we can confirm the BGP configuration and verify the tier-0 logical router has successfully paired with the upstream BGP neighbors.

  • Click Close
  • Click Tier-1 Gateways
  • Click > to expand the tier-1 gateway

We are also able to view the details for the tier-1 logical router as well.

  • Click the SDDC Manager browser tab
  • Click Dashboard

This concludes the demonstration on deploying an NSX Edge Cluster in preparation for enabling vSphere with Kubernetes.

 

vSphere with Kubernetes uses VMware NSX to provide network connectivity for vSphere Pods and related Kubernetes services.  This network connectivity is provided through an NSX Edge Cluster.  In this demonstration, we saw how VMware Cloud Foundation makes it easy to deploy and configure an NSX Edge Cluster and to configure an associated tier-0 and tier-1 logical routers.  

 

Follow along by completing the next demonstration showing how to enable vSphere with Kubernetes.

 

For more information on VMware Cloud Foundation, visit our website at  vmware.com/go/cloudfoundation.


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