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Kubernetes Sizing and Planning on VMware Cloud Foundation
September 29, 2020
A crucial step in planning your Kubernetes deployments on VMware Cloud Foundation is sizing the underlying infrastructure.     There are multiple components that need to be considered when sizing workload domains used to host Kubernetes clusters.

Use the demos below for a step by step overview on how to stand up developer ready infrastructure on VMware Cloud Foundation.


Enabling Kubernetes on Cloud Foundation is easily done in four easy steps:
(1) create a domain, (2) deploy an NSX Edge Cluster, (3) enable Workload Management, and (4) create and configure a vSphere Namespace.

After Kubernetes has been enabled, it's easy for developers to:
(5) create Tanzu Kubernetes Clusters (TKCs) and (6) deploy conainer based workloads.

Start Your Path
Step 1: Create Workload Domain for hosting Kubernetes
August 18, 2020
Demonstration of deploying a Workload Domain to support Kubernetes in VMware Cloud Foundation with Tanzu
Step 2: Deploy NSX Edge Cluster in preparation for enabling Kubernetes
August 18, 2020
Demonstration of deploying an NST-T Edge Cluster in VMware Cloud Foundation with Tanzu
Step 3: Enable Kubernetes (i.e. Workload Management) on the Workload Domain
August 18, 2020
Demonstration on enabling Kubernetes on VMware Cloud Foundation
Step 4: (optional) Enabling the Harbor Image Registry
August 18, 2020
Demonstration of enabling a Harbor Registry on VMware Cloud Foundation with Tanzu. 
Step 5: Create a vSphere Namespace and Enable Developer Access
August 18, 2020
Demonstration of creating a Namespace in VMware Cloud Foundation with Tanzu
Step 6: Download VMware CLI Tools and Deploy your first Tanzu Kubernetes Grid Cluster (TKC)
August 18, 2020
Demonstration of downloading vSphere Kubernetes CLI tools and creating a Tanzu Kubernetes Grid (TKG) cluster.

Join Technical Marketing Architect Kyle Gleed for a guided tour of standing up developer ready infrastructure on VMware Cloud Foundation.


Enabling Kubernetes on Cloud Foundation is easily done in four easy steps:
(1) create domain, (2) create NSX Edge Cluster, (3) enable Workload Management, and (4) create and configure a vSphere Namespace.

After Kubernetes has been enabled, it's easy for developers to:
(5) create Tanzu Kubernetes Clusters (TKCs) and (6) deploy vSphere Pod VMs.

Start Your Path
Step 1: Create Workload Domain for Hosting Kubernetes
September 11, 2020
This demo shows how to use the SDDC Manager to create a new Workload Domain in preparation for hosting Kubernetes on VMware Cloud Foundation with Tanzu.
Step 2: Deploy NSX Edge Cluster in preparation for Enabling Kubernetes
September 11, 2020
This demo shows how to use the SDDC Manager to automate the deployment of an NSX Edge Cluster inside a Workload Domain in preparation for hosting Kubernetes on VMware Cloud Foundation with Tanzu.
Step 3: Enabling Kubernetes (i.e. Workload Management) on Cloud Foundation
September 13, 2020
This demo shows how to use the SDDC Manager to enable the embedded Tanzu runtime environment on a vSphere cluster that has been provisioned as part of a Cloud Foundation Workload domain.
Step 4: Create vSphere Namespace and Configure Developer Access
September 13, 2020
This demo shows how to create a new vSphere Namespace on a vSphere cluster where Kubernetes has been enabled and enable developer access.
Demo: Deploying Tanzu Kubernetes Clusters (TKC) on Cloud Foundation
September 13, 2020
This demo shows how to deploy a Tanzu Kubernetes Grid cluster on a Kubernetes enabled vSphere Cluster provisioned as part of a Cloud Foundation workload domain.
Demo: Deploying vSphere Pod VMs on Cloud Foundation
September 13, 2020
This demo shows how developers can connect to a Kubernetes enabled vSphere Cluster to deploy container based applications on a Cloud Foundation workload domain.